Archive for October, 2011

If you like toasted coconut, you’ll love this beef salad. Flank steak is marinated in a brine made with coconut milk, and then it is grilled, thinly sliced, and served on a bed of lettuce, cucumber, and onion garnished with cilantro and strips of grill-toasted fresh coconut. To cut the fresh coconut into strips, you crack the coconut, drain the liquid, and use a vegetable peeler to shave the coconut meat into strips. The coconut adds richness to the lean flank steak and creates a highly aromatic main dish salad.

TIMING
Prep: 30 minutes (plus 5 minutes for brine)
Brine: 2 to 4 hours
Grill: 16 to 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Grill skillet or vegetable grill tray
– Heat-resistant grill glove
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 3 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
For the steak and coconut:
21/3 cups Javanese Coconut Brine
1 large flank steak, about 1½ pounds
1 coconut
3 tablespoons peanut oil or canola oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Oil for coating grill grate
For the dressing and salad:
¼ cup rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons coconut liquid from the coconut
3 tablespoons peanut oil or canola oil
1 large clove garlic, crushed
½ to 1 teaspoon sriracha hot sauce or other hot sauce
½ teaspoon kosher salt
1 small head Boston or Bibb lettuce, separated into leaves
1 cup thinly sliced English cucumber
1 cup thinly sliced sweet onion such as Vidalia
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

DIRECTIONS
1. For the steak and coconut: Set aside 3 tablespoons of the coconut brine and refrigerate. Put the remaining coconut brine in a gallonsize zipper-lock bag. Poke the flank steak all over with a fork or skewer to create holes. Add the steak to the bag, press out the air, seal, and massage the liquid gently into the meat. Refrigerate for 2 to 4 hours.
2. Crack the coconut, saving 3 tablespoons of the liquid for the dressing. Shave the coconut meat into strips, using a vegetable peeler. You should have about 2 cups of strips. Toss the coconut strips in a bowl with 1 tablespoon of the peanut oil.
3. Remove the steak from the brine and discard the brine. Pat the steak dry with paper towels and rub all over with the remaining 2 tablespoons peanut oil. Sprinkle all over with the salt. Let the steak rest at room temperature before grilling, at least 30 minutes.
4. Heat the grill as directed.
5. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Grill the coconut strips in a grill skillet or vegetable grill tray until lightly browned in spots, 10 to 15 minutes. Meanwhile, grill the steak directly over the heat for 8 to 10 minutes per side for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F), basting a few times with the reserved marinade.
6. Let the steak rest, loosely covered with foil, for 10 minutes before slicing. Cut across the grain into thin, diagonal slices.
7. For the dressing and salad: While the steak rests, whisk together the rice vinegar, sugar, reserved coconut liquid, peanut oil, garlic, hot sauce, and salt.
8. Line a platter or plates with the lettuce, cucumber, and onion. Drizzle with half of the dressing. Arrange the sliced steak and coconut strips on top. Drizzle with the remaining half of the dressing, garnish with the cilantro (if using), and serve.

CRACKING A COCONUT
1. Use a hammer (or the back of a cleaver) to drive a clean screwdriver through the dark “eyes” of the coconut. Drain the liquid coconut “water” out the holes into a bowl. Taste the coconut water.If it tastes sweet, it is fine. If it tastes sour, the coconut is rotten and should be discarded. Set aside 3 tablespoons of the coconut water for the dressing and refrigerate or freeze the rest (add coconut water to drinks or rice cooking liquid for a subtle coconut flavor).
2. Hammer the coconut shell all around its middle until it cracks and breaks in half. Put the halves in a kitchen towel and hammer each into about 6 pieces. Use the screwdriver to separate any brown shell stuck to the white coconut meat on each piece.
3. Use a vegetable peeler to trim the thinner brown skin from the coconut meat. Reserve half of the trimmed coconut meat for another use (refrigerate for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 6 months). Use the vegetable peeler to shave thin, wide strips of coconut from each piece of the remaining coconut meat.

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Venison always tastes best in the fall, so we like to pair it with apples and bourbon – a classic American flavor combination. Like the meat of most game, deer meat can be fairly lean and tough, but a brine changes all that. It allows the proteins in finely grained deer meat to retain more moisture during cooking so that the meat tastes juicy when served.

TIMING
Prep: 10 minutes
Brine: 2 to 6 hours
Grill: 10 to 14 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled spatula.

WHAT IS VENISON?
For most people, venison means deer meat. But it can also refer to the meat of related animals, such as elk, caribou, moose, and reindeer. That’s probably because the term “venison” comes from a Middle English word meaning “to hunt.” Any type of venison meat will work here, and you could also use buffalo or antelope.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 cup apple cider
½ cup bourbon
½ cup water
2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon cracked black peppercorns
1 tablespoon dried thyme
2 teaspoons crushed dried rosemary
2½ pounds venison leg steak, about 1 inch thick
¼ cup hazelnut or walnut oil
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the cider, bourbon, water, salt, peppercorns, thyme, and rosemary in a gallon zipper-lock bag; seal and shake until the salt dissolves, about 30 seconds.
2. Place the bag in a bowl just large enough to hold it snugly. Open the bag and add the venison. Seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening, and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and no more than 6 hours.
3. Heat the grill as directed.
4. Remove the venison from the marinade and discard the marinade. Pat the surface of the venison dry with paper towels and coat with the hazelnut oil.
5. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the venison on the grill, cover, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the meat registers between 130° and 140°F, 5 to 7 minutes per side. If your grill has an external temperature gauge, it should stay at around 450°F.

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Scotch Steak In The Coals with Stilton Butter - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

At first, we didn’t think putting meat directly onto hot coals would work; and in the first testing, it didn’t. Our mistake was using charcoal briquettes, which have too fine an ash. The ashes stuck to the steak and made it taste like soot. But when we made the steak with lump charcoal and again with a wood fire, it worked beautifully. The steak chars quickly on the clean coals, developing a crisp crust, and there is no residual ash to speak of. The trick is to blow the ash off the coals before adding the steak. For this, you’ll need a leaf blower, a hair dryer, a portable fan, or a magazine and a strong arm. It also helps to start with a relatively ash-free grill.

THE GRILL
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch lump charcoal bed (2 to 3 dozen pieces of lump charcoal, not briquettes)
No grill grate
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed, 4 inches deep
No grill grate.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
4 boneless strip steaks, preferably Angus, each 10 to 12 ounces and about 1 inch thick
½ cup Scotch
1 tablespoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
4 ounces Stilton or other blue cheese, crumbled
4 tablespoons (½ stick) butter, softened.

DIRECTIONS
1. Trim the fat on the steaks to about ¼ inch. Put the steaks and Scotch in a large freezer-weight zipper-lock bag, seal, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or up to 6 hours, turning occasionally.
2. Remove the steaks from the Scotch and pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle the salt and pepper all over the steaks, patting it in with your fingers. Let the meat sit at room temperature as you heat the grill.
3. Heat the grill as directed. Leave the grill grate off the grill so that the coals are accessible. Spread the coals to create a somewhat flat bed in the center where you will put the steaks. Blow the ashes off the coals with a leaf blower or hair dryer.
4. Grill the steaks directly on the flat bed of coals until nicely crusted, 3 to 5 minutes per side for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F). Remove to plates or a platter with tongs and pick off any loose ash. Let the meat rest off the heat, loosely covered with foil, for 5 minutes.
5. Mix together the cheese and butter. Melt about a tablespoon of the Stilton butter over each steak.

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Beef and horseradish make a heavenly match. Use prepared horseradish if you must, but you’ll get much better results with fresh horseradish root. Most supermarkets carry it, and you need only grate it on a box grater to complete this recipe. Paired with a balsamic reduction sauce, this combination is bound to win you over. To avoid overwhelming the beef with vodka, use ½ cup vodka and ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce when making the Horseradish Vodka Infusion.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes
Marinate: 2 to 6 hours
Grill: 6 to 10 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

TIP
– The balsamic brown butter sauce can be prepared in advance, left in the pan, and gently reheated just before serving.
– Use a smoky-tasting Scotch like Laphroaig to enhance the smoke flavor in the steak.

SHADES OF BEURRE
The beurre noir in this recipe is a classic French butter sauce made by cooking butter over low heat until it is dark brown, or noir, in color. As the butter darkens, it develops rich and heady aromas. The key is to brown the butter slowly so that it doesn’t burn. If you cook the butter to a light brown color, it is called beurre noisette (hazelnut). Beurre blanc (white) is a butter sauce made by whisking cold butter into a mixture of wine, vinegar, and shallots.

SHORTCUT
– Make the Stilton butter ahead of time and refrigerate it for up to 1 week

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 3 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS)
1 cup Horseradish Vodka Infusion
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large flank steak, about
1½ pounds 1½ teaspoons kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Oil for coating grill grate
½ cup (1 stick) butter, preferably unsalted
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons grated fresh horseradish

DIRECTIONS
1. Put the horseradish infusion and olive oil in a gallon-size zipperlock bag. Seal and shake to combine. Pour 2 tablespoons of the mixture into a small zipper-lock bag or bowl, seal or cover, and refrigerate.
2. Poke the flank steak all over with a fork or skewer to create holes. Add the steak to the large bag, press out the air, seal, and massage the liquid gently into the meat. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.
3. Heat the grill as directed.
4. Remove the steak from the marinade and discard the marinade. Pat the steak dry with paper towels and sprinkle all over with the salt and pepper. Let the steak rest at room temperature before grilling, about 30 minutes.
5. Brush and oil the grill grate. Grill the steak for 8 to 10 minutes per side for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F), basting a few times with the reserved marinade.
6. Let the steak rest, loosely covered with foil, for 5 minutes before slicing. Cut across the grain in thin, diagonal slices.
7. As the steak cooks, melt the butter over medium heat in a small sauté pan. When the butter foams, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until it turns from yellow to medium brown but not black, 5 to 7 minutes. Watch the butter carefully and do not let it become black or burnt. Pour the brown butter into a small, heatproof bowl, leaving the sediment in the pan. Raise the heat to medium and pour the balsamic vinegar into the pan, swirling it and letting it boil down to about half its volume. Remove from the heat and pour the browned butter back into the pan to combine.
8. Sprinkle the sliced steak with the parsley and horseradish. Drizzle with the balsamic brown butter and serve.

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The skirt is a long, flat strip of meat cut from the chest area of the animal. This area is very well exercised, so the meat is dense and tough, yet full of rich flavor. The key thing to remember about buffalo meat is that it’s quite lean compared to beef. Tenderize the meat with a somewhat acidic marinade and tend the steak carefully on the grill. It can cook to medium-rare in less than 10 minutes. When sliced across the grain into strips, it makes the perfect steak for fajitas.

TIMING
Prep: 5 minutes
Marinate: 4 to 6 hours
Grill: 10 to 16 minutes.

MAKING SUBSTITUTIONS
– If you can’t find buffalo meat, use the same amount of beef skirt
steak. You could also use flank steak.

TIMING
Prep: 10 minutes (plus 5 minutes for marinade)
Marinate: 2 hours or overnight
Grill: 16 to 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed, 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
1 tablespoon dried thyme
3 tablespoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
1/3 cup bourbon
2 cups water
¼ cup honey
2 pounds buffalo skirt steak
Oil for coating grill grate
¼ cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves.

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the thyme, salt, pepper, lemon zest, lemon juice, bourbon, water, and honey in a gallon-size zipper-lock plastic bag; seal and shake to dissolve the salt and honey, about 30 seconds.
2. Add the steak and seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours.
3. Heat the grill as directed. While the grill is heating, remove the steak from the bag and discard the marinade. Skirt steak can be quite long; to ease handling, cut it into approximately 9- to 10-inch lengths. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the steak(s) on the grill, cover, and grill for 5 to 8 minutes per side for mediumrare to medium-done (135° to 140°F).
4. Let rest for 5 minutes before slicing. Cut across the grain in thin, diagonal slices, and scatter the chopped mint leaves over the top.

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Flank steak is built for the grill. It’s full of flavor, easy to cook, and because it is boneless and its fibers run parallel to one another, it is incredibly easy to slice. If you are cooking a London broil cut from the round, you will need to tenderize it through brining. Soak it in 1½ cups Red Wine–Rosemary Brine or Steakhouse Brine for at least 6 hours. If brining it, baste the meat with the barbecue sauce while it is grilling.

TIMING
Prep: 5 minutes
Marinate: 2 hours
Grill: 16 to 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

GETTING CREATIVE
– Try this recipe with a butterflied boneless turkey breast; grill over medium heat for 10 to 12 minutes per side, until the meat bounces back when prodded.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
1 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons steak sauce
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
1 tablespoon spicy brown mustard
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
2 pounds flank steak
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the ketchup, steak sauce, hot pepper sauce, mustard, vinegar, 2 tablespoons oil, salt, and pepper in a gallonsize zipperlock plastic bag; seal and shake to combine, about 30 seconds.
2. Add the flank steak and seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
3. Heat the grill as directed. While the grill is heating, remove the steak from the bag and discard the marinade.
4. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the steak on the grill and cook for 8 to 10 minutes per side for medium-rare to mediumdone (135° to 140°F).
5. Let rest for 5 minutes before slicing. Cut across the grain in thin, diagonal slices and serve.

KNOW YOUR INGREDIENTS Will the Real London Broil Please Stand Up?
London broil is a scam. Fabricated by meat marketers as a cosmopolitan moniker for flank steak, it has come to mean any boneless slab of meat resembling flank steak – flat and roughly rectangular in shape. Unfortunately, not every meat that looks like flank steak can be cooked like it.
The problem stems from the fact that flank steak is an unique cut of meat. Unlike other tough cuts, which need to be cooked in simmering liquid to soften their tough fibers, flank steak can be grilled just like a more tender loin steak, due to the structure of its muscle fiber.
The tough, thick-walled muscle fibers of flank steak are long and thin and run absolutely parallel to one another. Grilling or broiling does nothing to tenderize them. If you were to try to bite into a perfectly grilled flank steak before it is sliced, your teeth would barely make a dent, but when you slice the steak thinly, across the grain of its fiber, you automatically tenderize the meat.
That’s why applying the name “London broil” to flank steak makes perfect sense. Even though the meat has nothing to do with Britain, it is a budget-priced piece of tough meat that can be broiled just like high-priced cuts. However, a problem arises when that same name is used for other tough cuts of meat.
These days, London broil is more commonly butchered from the round, a cut composed of overlapping layers of muscle fiber that run perpendicular and diagonally to one another. Such variegated graining makes it impossible to slice across the grain with any uniformity, because although you may be cutting across the grain on the surface, you will be slicing with the grain in the next layer underneath.
No wonder London broil has a reputation for inconsistency. The problem is not a matter of good meat versus bad, but rather a question of identifying exactly what meat one is buying. For triedand-true results, always use flank. But if you’re shopping price and London broil is on sale, make sure you know where it comes from. Then you can take the proper measures to tenderize the steak through marinating or brining.

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Rib-Eye Steaks with Fragrant Chile Rub and Salsa Butter - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

This cut of steak is so good for grilling that we decided to include a second recipe with a different flavor profile. As with the previous recipe, the rub here is rather assertive. But the heat of the chile peppers is tamed by the dairy fat in the butter sauce. We recommend getting the steak cut at least 1 inch thick and using the “sear and move” technique, as in the previous recipe. Sear the meat over high heat to develop a good crust, then move it over medium low heat to gently cook the interior to medium-rare. Of course, you could cook the steaks for more or less time, according to how you like them done.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals) with high- and low-heat areas
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed with a 4-inch-deep area for high heat and a 2-inch-deep area for low heat
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

TIMING
Prep: 5 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub and salsa butter)
Grill: About 10 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
4 boneless beef rib-eye steaks, each 8 to 10 ounces and about 1 inch thick
½ cup Fragrant Chile Rub
Oil for coating grill grate
½ cup Salsa Butter.

DIRECTIONS
1. Pat the steaks dry with paper towels, then scatter the chile rub over the steaks, patting it in with your fingers. Let the meat rest at room temperature as you heat the grill.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Grill the steaks over high heat until darkly crusted, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium-low (on a gas grill) or move the steaks to the low-heat area (on a charcoal or wood grill), cover, and grill for another 3 to 4 minutes for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F). Transfer to a platter, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 5 to 8 minutes.
4. Serve with the Salsa Butter.

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A rib-eye steak is nothing more then a boneless rib steak (a.k.a. Delmonico) cut from the rib section of the steer. These steaks include a fair amount of intramuscular fat that keeps the meat moist, so we like to flavor them with a dry rub and/or glaze rather than a marinade. This cut also stands up to fairly bold seasonings. Here, we dust the meat with a ground espresso rub and then glaze it with molasses-sweetened coffee. The flavors are strong and dark but don’t overwhelm the meat itself.

TIMING
Prep: 5 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Rest before grilling: 30 minutes to 1 hour
Grill: About 10 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals) with high- and low-heat areas
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed with a 4-inch-deep area for high heat and a 2-inch-deep area for low heat
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
4 boneless beef rib-eye steaks, each 8 to 10 ounces and about 1 inch thick
½ cup Black Espresso Rub
3 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons brewed espresso
1 tablespoon molasses
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Pat the steaks dry with paper towels, then sprinkle all over with the espresso rub, patting it in with your fingertips. Let sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 hour.
2. In a bowl, combine the melted butter, espresso, and molasses until blended.
3. Heat the grill as directed.
4. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Grill the steaks over high heat until darkly crusted, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium-low (on a gas grill) or move the steaks to the low-heat area (on a charcoal or wood grill), cover, and grill for another 3 to 4 minutes for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F). Brush both sides with the espresso mixture as the steaks finish cooking over low heat. Transfer to a platter, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 5 to 8 minutes before serving.

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Cut from the wide end of beef tenderloin, filet mignon ranks among the most tender cuts of meat available. It doesn’t have a lot of flavor, however, so we like to cut a pocket in a thick filet and stuff it with grilled and seasoned mushrooms, scallions, and garlic. A simple red wine sauce adds moisture and flavor.

TIMING
Prep: 20 minutes
Grill: About 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

TIP
– To save time, use olive oil spray in place of the olive oil.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals) with high- and low-heat areas
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed with a 4-inch-deep area for high heat and a 2-inch-deep area for low heat
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
4 filets mignons, each 8 to 10 ounces and 1½ to 2 inches thick
4 ounces (about 1½ cups) fresh large-cap shiitake mushrooms
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large scallion
1 large clove garlic, unpeeled
6 tablespoons (¾ stick) butter, softened
3 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, or 1 teaspoon dried
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Oil for coating grill grate
1½ cups full-bodied red wine
1 teaspoon honey.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Let the filets rest at room temperature, about 30 minutes.
3. Remove the stems from the mushrooms and brush clean if dirty in spots. Coat the mushroom caps all over with olive oil. Coat the scallion and unpeeled garlic clove with olive oil. If the garlic clove will fall through your grill grate, impale it on a skewer or toothpick.
4. Grill the mushrooms, scallion, and unpeeled garlic over medium heat until tender and grill-marked on both sides, 2 to 3 minutes total for the scallion and 5 to 8 minutes for the mushrooms and garlic. Peel the garlic, then chop it finely, along with the scallion and mushrooms. Toss the vegetables in a bowl with 2 tablespoons of the butter, 1 teaspoon of the chopped fresh thyme (or ¼ teaspoon dried), ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. 5. Cut a pocket through the side of the filets without cutting all the way through to the other side. Use a spoon to stuff each filet with the mushroom mixture (use about 2 tablespoons filling per filet). Gently press on the outside of the pocket to enclose the filling. Pat the outside of the steaks dry with paper towels, then coat all over with the remaining olive oil and sprinkle with ½ teaspoon of the salt and ¼ teaspoon of the pepper.
6. Brush and oil the grill grate, then grill the filets over high heat until nicely grill-marked, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium-low (on a gas grill) or move the steaks to the low-heat area (on a charcoal or wood grill), cover, and grill for another 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F). Remove to warm plates and cover with foil to keep warm for 5 minutes. Avoid overcooking, as the steaks will continue to cook slightly off the heat.
7. As the steaks rest, bring the wine and remaining 2 teaspoons thyme (or ¾ teaspoon dried) to a boil in a medium skillet or saucepan over medium-high heat (on your grill’s side burner if it has one). Boil until the wine reduces to one-third of its volume, about ½ cup. Reduce the heat to low and stir in the honey and the remaining 4 tablespoons butter, ¼ teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.
8. Serve the filets mignons with the wine sauce.

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The famous steak from Florence is essentially a grilled porterhouse. What makes it remarkable, however, is the Italian beef itself. Bistecca alla Fiorentina is traditionally made with steaks from Chianina cattle, a giant breed raised in the Val di Chiana near Arezzo. These enormous white oxen produce tender, flavorful steaks of considerable size – each steak can weigh upwards of 5 pounds. If you’re interested in buying some of this extraordinary beef, contact the American Chianina Association, or try to find steaks from another high-quality breed such as Kobe. This simply seasoned and grilled steak is often served with lemon wedges for squeezing. We also put some lemon into the marinade to further flavor the meat.

TIMING
Prep: 8 minutes
Marinate: 8 to 24 hours
Soak wood chips: 30 minutes
Grill: About 25 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– 1 cup oak or hickory wood chips or chunks
– Smoker box or foil packet, if using a gas grill
– Long-handled tongs.

TIPS
– Most supermarkets don’t usually cut steaks this thick. Call the meat department or your butcher ahead of time to order it.
– With these steaks, the T-shaped bone separates the smaller and more tender tenderloin (or filet) from the larger and slightly tougher top loin (strip). To cook both sections evenly, put the smaller, more tender section facing the low-heat area of the grill during the initial searing.
– Make 4 servings by cutting the 2 sections away from the bone and then cutting them into 4 pieces or by cutting all of the meat into ½-inch-thick slices and serving each guest a mix of tenderloin and top loin slices. The T-bone itself is up for grabs.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, high (500°F)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Charcoal:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals) with high- and low-heat areas Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, red hot
12-by-12-inch bed with a 4-inch-deep area for high heat and a 2-inch-deep area for low heat
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 large lemon
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 large porterhouse or T-bone steak, 2½ to 3 pounds and at least 2 inches thick
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Cut the lemon in half lengthwise. Squeeze the juice from half of the lemon into a large zipper-lock bag. Reserve the other half. Add
3 tablespoons of the olive oil, 1 teaspoon of the salt, and ½ teaspoon of the pepper to the bag. Add the steak, press the air out of the bag, and seal the top. Massage the marinade into the meat and refrigerate overnight or up to 24 hours.
2. When ready to grill, remove the marinating steak from the refrigerator and let it rest at room temperature for 1 hour. Soak the wood chips in cold water for 30 minutes.
3. Heat the grill as directed, adding wood chips to the low-heat area of the grill until they smolder. If using a gas grill without a smoker box, put the chips in a packet of foil, poke holes in the foil, and put the foil directly over one of the gas burners.
4. Remove the steak from the marinade and discard the marinade. Brush and oil the grill grate, then grill the steak over high heat until darkly crusted, 4 to 6 minutes per side. Sprinkle all over with the remaining 1 teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper as you turn the steak. Reduce the heat to medium-low (on a gas grill) or move the steaks to the low-heat area (on a charcoal or wood grill), cover, and grill for another 10 to 15 minutes for medium-rare to medium-done (135° to 140°F). Transfer to a platter, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 5 to 8 minutes.
5. While the steak rests, coat the reserved lemon half with a little of the remaining olive oil and grill, cut-side down, over medium-high heat until nicely grill-marked, 1 to 2 minutes. Cool slightly, then cut the lemon into 4 wedges.
6. Serve the steak with the grilled lemon wedges and the remaining olive oil for drizzling.

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