Archive for January, 2012

Some ingredients ask nothing more from us than a little privacy: an hour or two of solitude over a moderate fire, flanked by a flock of garlic, a glaze of extra-virgin oil, and a crusting of coarse salt and pepper. If you are smart enough to give such respect to a standing rib roast of beef, it will reward you beyond measure. If possible, have your butcher cut the meat from the bone along the ribs, leaving it attached at its widest end.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes
Grill: About 2 hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Large, heavy-duty spatula or pair of heat-resistant gloves

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill–1 side off
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
3-bone standing rib roast of beef, about 3 pounds
6 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed, placing the roasting pan away from the heat.
2. If the meat was not cut from the bone when you purchased it (see the recipe introduction), do this yourself, leaving it attached at its widest end.
3. Mix the garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper in a small bowl and rub all over the meat, including the underside where it is sitting on the bones.
4. Put the roast, bone-side down, on the grill away from the heat (over the roasting pan), cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers about 130°F for medium-rare, about 2 hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal, you will probably have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
5. Remove the beef to a large carving board; let rest for at least 10 minutes. Carve and serve. Carving will have been made much easier by separating the roast from the bone before cooking.

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Smoky Barbecued Duck - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

There are two types of duck in the classic culinary world. Long Island duckling is the bird for a Chinese classic, like Peking duck. Muscovy duck is for European fare, like pressed duck. The main difference between the two is the size of the breast (Muscovy is meatier) and the amount of fat (Muscovy is leaner). Traditionally, Long Island ducks are more commonly available in the United States, but that is changing. Muscovy is easier to use in this recipe, but a Long Island will be fine; it just takes a little more work.

TIMING
Soak wood chips: 1 hour
Prep: 30 minutes (plus 10 minutes for glaze and rub)
Grill: About 1½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– 4 fruitwood chunks or 2 cups chips if using a smoker box
– Smoker box or foil packet, if using a gas grill
– Long-handled basting brush
– Spray bottle of water.

SUBSTITUTING A LONG ISLAND DUCKLING
If you don’t have a Muscovy duck for this recipe, you can substitute a Long Island duckling, but you should follow the method from the recipe for Teriyaki Duck on page 198, inflating the skin with a bicycle pump and drying the duck before cooking it, in order to get rid of the excess fat.

THE GRILL
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Gas:
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
¾ cup Steakhouse Glaze
1 teaspoon ground chipotle chile
1 Muscovy duck, about 5 pounds
2½ tablespoons Jerk Rub
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Soak the wood chunks or chips for about 1 hour.
2. Heat the grill as directed. Mix the glaze and chipotle, and set aside.
3. Cut off the neck skin of the duck with scissors and remove any visible pockets of fat with your fingers. Wash the duck inside and out, and poke the skin deeply with a fork, especially where there are noticeable fat deposits, around the legs and along the sides of the breast. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the jerk rub into the cavity of the duck. Rub the rest of the rub over the skin.
4. Place the disposable pan in the opening of the fire bed and put the wood chunks directly over the coals. If using a gas grill, put the wood chips in a smoker box or in a foil packet directly over one of the heated burners.
5. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the duck, breast-side down, on the grill directly over the fire; cover and grill for 10 minutes, until the breast skin browns. Douse any flare-ups with water from a spray bottle. Turn the duck over so that the breast side is facing up, and put it on the grill over the disposable pan away from direct heat. Cover the grill and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest
part of the breast registers about 165°F, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Baste the duck with the glaze every 5 minutes during the last 20 minutes of cooking. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal, you will probably have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
6. Remove the duck to a large serving platter. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve and serve as you would a chicken.

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Yet another way to rid a duck of fat is to pierce the skin around its fatty parts (the sides of the breast and the undersides of the thighs), making holes through which the fat can drain, and then pouring boiling water over the fatty areas to warm the fat and give it a head start. This method works better with a Muscovy duck, which is less fatty than the Long Island variety. The skin will not be as crisp as with the bicycle pump method (see the introduction to the recipe on the facing page), but the technique is much simpler and takes far less time. The flavors of orange and rosemary are classic with duck.

TIMING
Prep: 30 minutes (plus 5 minutes for brine)
Brine: 2 to 8 hours
Grill: About 1½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Roasting rack
– Disposable aluminum foil roasting pan
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 duck, about 5 pounds, preferably Muscovy
2 cups Orange-Fennel Brine
2 tablespoons crushed dried rosemary
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
3 tablespoons maple syrup
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 orange, quartered
1 small onion, peeled and quartered.

DIRECTIONS
1. Wash the duck inside and out and poke the skin with a fork, especially where there are noticeable fat deposits under the skin, around the legs and along the sides of the breast.
2. Heat a kettle of water to boiling. Put the duck, breast-side up, in a strainer set in a sink. Pour the boiling water over the duck. Dry the duck and put it in a large (gallon-size) zipper-lock bag. Add the brine, 1 tablespoon of the rosemary, and 1 tablespoon of the sherry vinegar. Seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening, and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the duck and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 8 hours. 3. Mix the maple syrup and remaining 1 tablespoon vinegar in a small bowl; set aside.
4. Heat the grill as directed.
5. Remove the duck from the marinade and discard the marinade. Pat dry. Rub the interior cavity of the duck with the remaining 1 tablespoon dried rosemary and the pepper. Put the orange and onion quarters in the interior cavity, and put the duck, breast-side up, on a rack set in the disposable roasting pan. Put the pan on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast registers 165°F, about 1½ hours. Baste the duck with the maple mixture 3 times during the last half hour. If your grill has an external thermometer, it should stay at around 375°F. If you are using charcoal, you will probably have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
6. Remove the duck to a large serving platter. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve as you would a chicken and serve. Do not serve the orange and onion that were stuffed into the duck.

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When the first direction in a recipe calls for a bicycle pump, you know you’re in for a good time. If anyone asks why you’re laughing, your response will be that ducks have a fat problem. Which is true enough; they have a lot of it, and you want to get rid of most of it before anyone takes a bite, but you also want it to hang around long enough to flavor the duck and keep it moist. The best method is to create a channel between the fat and the meat that gives the fat an escape route as it melts and continually bastes the meat while it’s cooking. That’s where the bicycle pump comes in. By inserting the needle of the pump just under the fat in the skin, you can force air under the fat, and presto, you’ve got your channel. It is best to use a hand pump, since a standing pump is ungainly. If you have a marinade injector, that works too, although it takes a little longer.

TIMING
Prep: 30 minutes Dry: 2 hours
Grill: About 1 hour.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Small bicycle pump with a needle attachment, or a marinade injector
– Kitchen twine
– Electric fan
– Roasting rack
– Disposable aluminum foil roasting pan.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill–1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on high setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
For the duck:
1 Long Island duckling, about 4½ pounds, visible fat removed
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons honey
¼ teaspoon Chinese chili paste with garlic
1 clove garlic, minced
For the chutney:
8 large, moist dates, such as Medjool, pits removed
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon peeled and minced ginger root
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 orange
¼ teaspoon Chinese chili paste with garlic
¼ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 scallions, roots trimmed, thinly sliced.

DIRECTIONS
1. Extend the plunger of the bicycle pump. Insert the needle just  under the skin at the neck end of the duck. Depress the plunger,and the skin around the needle will puff up. Continue to pump air under the duck skin in the same way until the skin has been separated from the meat all over the breast and legs.
2. Heat a kettle of water to boiling. Put the duck, breast-side up, in a strainer set in a sink. Pour the boiling water over the duck. Hook a chopstick under the wings of the duck to hold them away from the body. Tie a string tightly around the neck and hang the duck over a sink or a large drip pan. Place an electric fan in front of the duck and blow air directly on it for about an hour to dry the skin.
3. Mix the soy sauce, honey, chili paste, and garlic in a small bowl. Brush over the duck and dry in front of the fan for another hour.
4. Heat the grill as directed.
5. Put the duck, breast-side up, on a rack set in the disposable roasting pan. Put on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast registers 165°F, about 1 hour. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
6. While the duck is grilling, prepare the chutney. Chop the dates finely and mix with the remaining ingredients. Set aside; the mixture will thicken as it sits.
7. Remove the duck to a large serving platter. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve as you would a chicken and serve with chutney.

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Turkey legs are tough and stringy – and cheap. They typically sell for less than a third of the price of turkey breast, an opportunity you will have no problem taking advantage of once you have a recipe like this to turn the culinary challenges of a turkey leg into a flavorful asset. Remember, when it comes to meat, tough and stringy equals flavorful and moist. Brining helps to soften tough fibers, and in this case infuses the meat with chai spices and sweet apple. Low, slow grilling makes the meat melt off the bone. It takes a little time (about an hour and a half on the grill) but almost no attention, and the process is foolproof. There’s no way to screw this one up.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes (plus 5 minutes for brine)
Brine: 2 to 6 hours
Grill: About 1 hour and 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled spatula or long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
2 cups Apple-Chai Brine
1¼ teaspoons ground poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon dried sage
½ teaspoon crushed dried rosemary
4 turkey thighs and/or drumsticks, about 4 pounds
4 cups apple cider
2 cloves garlic, smashed
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the brine, 1 teaspoon of the poultry seasoning, the sage, and the rosemary in a large zipper-lock bag, seal, and shake. 2. Put the bag in a bowl just large enough to hold it snugly. Open the bag and add the turkey. Seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening, and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or as long as 6 hours.
3. To make the cider basting syrup, combine the cider, garlic, and remaining ¼ teaspoon poultry seasoning in a large skillet. Boil over high heat until reduced to one-quarter of its volume, about 1 cup. Season with the salt and pepper and set aside.
4. Heat the grill as directed.
5. Remove the turkey from the marinade and discard the marinade.
6. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the turkey on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a leg registers about 170°F, about 1 hour and 20 minutes, turning once in the first hour. In the last 20 minutes of cooking, turn and baste with the apple cider syrup every 5 minutes. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will probably have to replenish the coals or wood after the first hour.
7. Remove to a large serving platter, drizzle with any remaining cider syrup, and serve.

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There are several ways of stuffing ingredients into a solid hunk of meat. You can cut a pocket in the center, butterfly it, or disperse the stuffing throughout the roast as is done here, a technique known as larding. Classically, larding is done to game meats to get fat (lardons) deep into the interior of meats that lack marbling. In this recipe, you make holes all over a meaty turkey breast and then plug them up with a tangy paste of green olives, garlic, and lemon. Try to space the holes evenly so that every slice gets its share of the flavor.

TIMING
Prep: 20 minutes (plus 5 minutes for relish)
Grill: About 1 hour.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled spatula
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS)
18 large pitted green olives, coarsely chopped (about ¾ cup)
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
1 boneless turkey breast half, preferably with skin on, about 3½ pounds
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
¼ teaspoon dried thyme
Oil for coating grill grate
½ cup Preserved Lemon Relish.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Mix the olives, 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, the garlic, and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl.
3. Plunge a long, thin-bladed knife into the turkey breast and twist to make a hole. Stuff the hole with some of the green olive tapenade. Repeat until the turkey is uniformly punctuated with tapenade, making about 12 holes in all.
4. In another bowl, mix the lemon juice, 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste and coat the outside of the turkey with this mixture.
5. Mix the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, the lemon zest, the thyme, and salt and pepper to taste in another bowl; set aside.
6. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the turkey on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast registers about 165°F, about 1 hour. Baste twice with the olive oil – lemon zest mixture during the last 30 minutes of cooking. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
7. Remove to a large serving platter, using tongs and a spatula for support. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve and serve with preserved lemon relish, if desired.

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Ancho Turkey Breast Stuffed With Corn And Black Beans - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

Boneless turkey breasts are generally sold in one of four ways: as a whole breast with skin, as a half breast with skin, as a half breast without skin, or as a butterflied skinless breast, which can also be labeled “turkey London broil”. Any of these forms will work for this recipe, although the last one will take the least amount of prep work on your part. Butterflying meat is not difficult. It involves slitting the meat through its thicker parts so that it opens out into a flat rectangle. The breasts of poultry, because they are relatively flat and rectangular to begin with, are very easy to butterfly.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
¼ cup Fragrant Chile Rub
1 boneless, skinless turkey breast half, about 3 pounds, butterflied
1 ear corn, with husk on
1 medium onion, unpeeled
1 whole jalapeño chile
1 whole tomato
1 can (10 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
1 dozen corn tortilla chips, crushed
Oil for coating grill grate.

BUTTERFLYING BONELESS MEAT
Butterflying is a technique for cutting a thick, boneless piece of meat to make it flatter and wider so that it can be stuffed, or so that it will grill faster. The first step is to open the meat up like a book. This is done by placing the meat flat on a cutting board, slicing horizontally into the center of one of its long sides until you get all of the way across but not through the other side.
Open the two sides up like a book. If the meat is now an even thickness all the way across, you can proceed with the recipe; usually this is not the case, however. You can reduce the thickness in the thicker areas by making shallow slits wherever there is a bulge and pressing on that section to spread it out.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Reserve 1 teaspoon of the chile rub, and rub the rest all over the turkey breast. Wrap in plastic or put in a plastic bag and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes.
3. Put the corn, onion, jalapeño, and tomato directly over the fire. Close the grill and cook until the surfaces of all are speckled, about 5 minutes. Turn and continue cooking until all of the vegetables are blackened all around. This will take about 8 minutes for the tomato and chile, 12 minutes for the onions and corn. Set the vegetables aside until they are cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes.
4. Remove the husk from the corn. Hold the ear of corn upright; cut off the kernels by slicing down the length of the ear with a slimbladed knife. Discard the stem and seeds from the chile and dice the flesh finely (you may want to use rubber gloves to protect your hands). Core the tomato and peel the onion; chop both into small pieces.
5. Mash half of the black beans with the back of a fork in a medium bowl, adding enough water to make a smooth paste.
6. To make the stuffing, mix the vegetables with the mashed black beans, the whole black beans, the crushed tortilla chips, and the reserved teaspoon of rub.
7. If cooking over charcoal, replenish the coals.
8. Place three 12-inch lengths of kitchen twine side by side on a work surface. Remove the turkey from its wrapping and place it, butterflied-side up, on top of the twine. Spread the stuffing over the top of the turkey, and roll the turkey up into a log, encasing the stuffing in the center. Tie the twine to secure.
9. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the rolled breast on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center registers about 170°F, about 1 hour, turning 2 to 3 times to help it cook evenly. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
10. Remove to a cutting board; let rest for 8 to 10 minutes, then slice and serve.

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If you don’t get enough occasions to ram a can into a chicken, this recipe provides a delicious opportunity to do so. Here a can of artichoke hearts flavored with herbs, garlic, wine, and lemon simmers on the grill while the chicken roasts regally above. The contents of the can become a light sauce and garnish for the finished chicken.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Grill: About 1½ hours.

GRILL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
• Long-handled tongs
• Long-handled spatula.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 chicken, about 4 pounds, washed and dried
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon Tuscan Rosemary Rub
3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
¼ cup white wine
1 can (about 14 ounces) artichoke heart quarters, drained.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Rub the chicken inside and out with the 2 tablespoons rub, and rub the outside of the chicken with 2 teaspoons of the olive oil.
3. Stir the lemon juice, wine, and remaining 1 teaspoon rosemary rub into the artichokes, still in the can. Remove the label from the can and coat the outside of the can with the remaining 1 teaspoon olive oil. Put on a plate or sturdy sheet pan. Lower the chicken onto the can, inserting the can into the internal cavity of the bird. Position the chicken so that the legs and the can form a tripod holding the chicken upright.
4. Put the chicken and can on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a thigh registers about 170°F, about 1½ hours. If your grill has an external temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will probably have to replenish after the first hour.
5. Transfer the chicken, still on the can, to a plate or tray, using tongs to hold the chicken and a spatula slipped under the can. Holding the can with tongs and gripping the chicken with a towel or silicone grill mits, twist and lift the chicken off the can. Transfer to a carving board. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve and serve with the artichoke hearts, drizzling any liquid left in the can over the carved chicken.

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We know you know about cooking chicken with a beer can stuffed up its butt. The sight of poultry compromised by brew has become a grilling icon, and it is the inspiration for this concoction, which attempts an improvement on the original by having something in the offending can that can actually be eaten (not just swilled). By grilling chicken on a can of baked beans, you get a perfectly roasted chicken, plus a side dish of baked beans flavored with chicken drippings and spice rub.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Grill: About 1½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled spatula.

THE GENIUS OF COOKING CHICKEN ON A CAN
Poultry has an engineering problem. The white meat is done at a temperature 10°F lower than the dark meat, resulting in roasted chickens with either desiccated breasts or wobbly thighs. The trick is to get the leg sections cooking faster or the breasts cooking slower, which is exactly what standing a chicken upright on a grill does. By perching a chicken on a can (or a vertical roaster), you lift the breast away from the fire and place the legs (especially the pesky hip joint, which is always the last part to get done) right next to the flame. The outcome is miraculous: No parts are dry and no parts are raw perfect chicken every time.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill–1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 chicken, about 4 pounds, washed and dried
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon Fragrant Chile Rub
3 teaspoons canola oil
1 can (about 16 ounces) baked beans.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Rub the chicken inside and out with the 2 tablespoons chile rub, and rub the outside of the chicken with 2 teaspoons of the oil.
3. Open the can of beans. Stir the 1 teaspoon chile rub into the beans. Remove the label from the can and coat the outside of the can with the remaining 1 teaspoon oil. Put on a plate or sturdy sheet pan. Lower the chicken onto the can, inserting the can into the internal cavity of the bird. Position the chicken so that the legs and the can form a tripod holding the chicken upright.
4. Put the chicken and can on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a thigh registers about 170°F, about 1½ hours. If your grill has an external temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will probably have to replenish after the first hour.
5. Transfer the chicken, still on the can, to a plate or tray, using tongs to hold the chicken and a spatula slipped under the can. Holding the can with tongs and gripping the chicken with a towel or silicone grill mitts, twist and lift the chicken off the can. Transfer to a carving board. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve and serve with the beans.

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Tuscan Roasted Chicken Stuffed With Fragrant Greens - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

Tuscan Roasted Chicken Stuffed with Fragrant Greens This gorgeous rustic chicken is Tuscan in the truest sense. It is simple and sophisticated, a blend of grilled meat, forest herbs, vibrant greens, toasted nuts, garlic, olive oil, and grapes, clouded and puckered from bursting. The stuffing can be made with any hearty green, although red chard is the most visually striking.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill–middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill–1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1 bunch red chard, kale, or broccoli rabe, cut into large bite-size pieces
1 cup (about 2 ounces) red seedless grapes
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons mashed roasted garlic
½ cup (about 2 ounces) walnut halves and pieces
1 chicken, about 4 pounds, washed and dried
2 teaspoons Tuscan Rosemary Rub
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the chard and boil until barely tender, about 3 minutes; drain.
3. Meanwhile, toss the grapes with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil. Cook in a skillet over high heat on the stove, or in a grill skillet on the grill directly over the heat, until the grapes plump and a few pop.
4. Mix the chard, grapes, 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, 1 tablespoon of the roasted garlic, and the walnuts in a bowl.
5. Separate the skin from the breast and legs of the chicken, and gently but firmly insert your index finger under the skin at the neck end of the chicken. Move it around, separating the skin from the meat underneath. Gradually ease your whole hand under the skin, loosening the skin from the breast, legs, and drumsticks.
6. Mix the remaining tablespoon of roasted garlic with 1 teaspoon of the herb rub and 1 tablespoon olive oil in a small bowl. Spoon the garlic mixture under the skin and push it evenly over the breast and legs of the chicken by rubbing the skin to spread it.
7. Spoon the remaining 1 teaspoon rub into the interior of the chicken and rub over the walls of the internal cavity. Spoon the chard and grape stuffing into the cavity, and tie the legs of the chicken together with kitchen twine. Rub the outside of the chicken with the remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil.
8. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the chicken on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast registers about 170°F, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal, you will probably have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
9. Remove the chicken to a large serving platter using tongs, with a spatula for support. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve and serve along with some of the stuffing.

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