Archive for February, 2012

Spareribs and citrus don’t seem like a match made in barbecue heaven, but think about it. The acid in the citrus is a counterpoint to the rich fat of ribs, turning them from something slathered and gooey to something clean and spare. We finish them with a thin, spicy bourbon syrup just to make sure your fingers get sticky.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
2 racks ribs, about 4 pounds, St. Louis cut spareribs or baby back ribs
2½ cups Spicy Citrus Brine
Oil for coating grill grate
1 cup Hot Pepper–Bourbon Syrup.

DIRECTIONS
1. Cut the racks in half. Put them in a gallon-size zipper-lock bag with the citrus brine. Seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening, and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for 6 to 12 hours.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the ribs on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the ribs registers about 155°F, about 1 hour. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
4. Brush the ribs with the bourbon syrup during the last 10 minutes, turning and basting until all of the syrup has been used up.
5. Remove the ribs to a large platter, cut into 1- or 2-rib sections, and serve.

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This is truly an impressive presentation. Like a standing rib roast of beef, a rack of pork is regal, with its bulging eye, crusted with spices, herbs, and mustard, perched atop an arch of bones. A 4-rib rack, weighing 3½ pounds, will feed 6 people amply, but if you want to give each person a bone you will have to plan on almost a pound per person, which will come out to about 10 ounces of meat per serving. A roast of that size will not take any longer to cook, since it will have approximately the same circumference, but you will have to prepare about 50 percent more of the mustard coating.

TIMING
Prep: 10 minutes
Grill: About 2 hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled spatula.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
2 tablespoons spicy brown mustard
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
4-rib rack of pork, about 3½ pounds
Oil for coating grill grate
½ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
4 pineapple slices, ½ inch thick, peeled, cored, and quartered.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Mix the mustard, cinnamon, allspice, rosemary, black pepper, 2 teaspoons of the canola oil, and 1 tablespoon of the brown sugar in a bowl. Brush over the meaty parts of the pork.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the pork on the grill, bone-side down, away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers about 150°F, about 2 hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will probably have to replenish the coals or wood after the first hour.
4. While the pork is cooking, mix the remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar with the salt and red pepper flakes; set aside. Coat the pineapple slices with the remaining 1 tablespoon canola oil.
5. During the last 20 minutes of cooking the pork, put the pineapple on the grill directly over the heat and cook until browned on both sides, sprinkling with the salt–brown sugar mixture immediately after turning.
6. Remove the pork to a large serving platter, using tongs and a spatula for support, and surround it with grilled pineapple. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; carve as you would a rib roast and serve with some of the pineapple.

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Pulled Pork Three Ways - BBQ And Grilling Recipes Pulled Pork with Pungent Vietnamese Sauce

Pork is the most common meat in the world, and every culture that eats it has a recipe involving long, slow cooking that ends up with the pork in shreds. Whether you are from South Carolina, southern Italy, or Southeast Asia, you know about pulled pork. The only difference is what you flavor the meat with after it cooks, and how you choose to present it. Here is a recipe to serve as an international guide. It includes enough to make 8 portions of pulled pork, and enough of three different sauces and accompaniments to flavor all of that pork. It is assumed that you will choose one way, but if you want to make all three, either you will need three times the amount of pork, or you will need to cut all of the sauce ingredients down by two-thirds.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
80 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting
Wood:
Indirect heat, medium ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Additional wood for replacement
Clean, oiled grate set 4 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 8 SERVINGS)
For the pork:
1 boneless pork shoulder, about 5 pounds
¼ cup Fragrant Chile Rub
2 tablespoons canola oil
Oil for coating grill grate
For the South Carolina Vinegar Mop:
¾ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons Tabasco hot pepper sauce
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
8 hamburger rolls, for serving
For the Pungent Vietnamese Sauce:
1 cup Vietnamese Dipping Sauce
8 leaves romaine lettuce, for serving
4 radishes, thinly sliced and cut into strips, for serving
½ cucumber, peeled, seeded, and cut into thin slices, for serving
For the Sicilian Bath:
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup red wine vinegar
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano leaves, or ¼ teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves, or ¼ teaspoon dried rosemary
½ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
8 sub rolls, for serving
2 large onions, cut into ½-inch-thick slices and grilled until tender, halved, for serving.

DIRECTIONS
1. Rub the pork all over with the rub. Roll and tie the pork into a compact bundle, and rub it all over with the 2 tablespoons oil. Set aside for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 hour.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the pork on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers about 185°F, 3 to 4 hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will have to replenish the coals or wood every hour.
4. While the pork is cooking, make one of the sauces by combining the ingredients in a bowl; set aside.
5. Remove the pork to a cutting board, using tongs and a spatula for support, cover with foil, and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Untie and cut the meat into 1½-inch-thick slices. Pull the slices apart with your fingers or 2 forks into shreds, discarding large pockets of fat as you proceed. Mix the pulled pork with one of the sauces. Serve South Carolina pulled pork on hamburger rolls. Serve Vietnamese pulled pork wrapped in lettuce leaves with slivers of radish and cucumber. Serve Sicilian pulled pork on sub rolls topped with grilled onions.

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Pancetta is cured pork belly. Often called Italian bacon, it is not much like bacon in either appearance or flavor. Pancetta is cured with salt, pepper, and other spices or herbs, but unlike bacon, it is not smoked. Bacon is from either the sides or the belly of the pig and is usually cut into slices; pancetta comes only from the belly and is generally sold rolled up into a sausage shape. Pancetta has a unique flavor that largely comes from its fatty parts, so don’t trim it of fat. If you can’t find it, you can substitute bacon, but the flavor will be completely different.

TIMING
Prep: 10 minutes
Grill: 8 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on middle setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set about 4 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
3 cloves garlic, minced
1½ teaspoons minced fresh rosemary
1 ounce pancetta, finely chopped (about ¼ cup)
¼ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 pork tenderloins, a little more than 1 pound each
1 tablespoon olive oil
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Mix the garlic, rosemary, pancetta, salt, and pepper in a bowl.
3. Make a slit down the length of each tenderloin so that they open up like books. Rub all over with the pancetta mixture and coat with the olive il. Set aside for 5 minutes.
4. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the tenderloins on the grill, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers about 155°F, about 8 minutes, turning halfway through. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 400°F.
5. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; slice and serve.

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The picnic shoulder is a popular cut of pork for barbecue. That’s because it’s a little leaner than the butt portion of the shoulder but still has great flavor. The picnic comes from the upper foreleg, so it is smaller in circumference than the butt, and better for a smaller crowd. We like this recipe with some smoke, but if you don’t have any wood, it’s delicious smoke-free as well.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– 4 fruitwood chunks or 2 cups chips if using a smoker box
– Smoker box or foil packet, if using a gas grill
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled spatula
– Long-handled basting brush.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
1 boneless pork shoulder (picnic ham), about 2¾ pounds
2 tablespoons Fragrant Chile Rub
1 tablespoon canola oil
¾ cup Sweet, Hot, and Sour BBQ Sauce
½ cup maple syrup
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Soak the wood chunks or chips for about 1 hour.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Rub the pork with the chile rub. Coat with the 1 tablespoon oil. Mix the barbecue sauce and maple syrup in a bowl; set aside. 4. Put the wood chunks directly over the coals. If using a gas grill, put the wood chips in a smoker box or in a foil packet directly over one of the heated burners.
5. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the pork on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat registers about 165°F, about 2½ hours, turning the meat a quarter turn every 40 minutes or so for the first 2 hours. Baste with the barbecue sauce mixture every 5 minutes during the last 30 minutes of cooking. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If you are using charcoal or wood, you will probably have to replenish the coals or wood after each hour.
6. Remove the pork to a serving platter, using tongs and a spatula for support. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; slice and serve.

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The sweet, nutty, fragrant mixture of pistachios, garlic, lemon, and herbs runs through the heart of this pork loin. Try to buy roasted shelled pistachios. If you can’t find them, you will have to shell about 30 nuts to make 1/3 cup. The easiest way to toast them is in a microwave. Put the nuts on a plate and cook them at full power for 2 minutes. Stir and cook in 30-second intervals until they smell toasted.

TIMING
Prep: 20 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Grill: About 1 hour.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium-high (350° to 375°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
1/3 cup shelled roasted pistachio nuts, coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons golden raisins, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
¼ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 center-cut pork loin, about 2 pounds, 7½ inches long and 2½ inches in diameter
3 tablespoons Tuscan Rosemary Rub
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine the pistachio nuts, raisins, garlic, lemon zest, parsley, salt, pepper, and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a bowl.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Insert a long, thin-bladed knife into the center of one end of the roast until the tip comes out the other end. Enlarge the hole so that it is about 1 inch wide all the way through the roast. Stuff the hole with the pistachio mixture. Rub the outside with the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and the herb rub.
4. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the roast on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of the meat registers about 155°F, about 1 hour, turning it once halfway through. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay between 350° and 375°F.
5. Remove to a large serving platter; drizzle with the lemon juice. Let rest for 8 to 10 minutes; slice and serve.

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Dinosaur Ribs - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

These super-meaty ribs look as though they came from a primeval creature, but they are really just beef ribs. If your butcher cuts his own rib-eye roast or steaks, he will have the rib bones that he removed from the cut; that’s what you want. For some reason the cut is unusual, and if you can’t find them, more diminutive short ribs will work just as well. Just tell everyone it was a baby dinosaur.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium-high (350° to 375°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium-light ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

TIMING
Prep: 10 minutes (plus 10 minutes for rub and glaze)
Grill: 30 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 SERVINGS)
8 beef back ribs, about 10 ounces each
¼ cup Cajun Blackening Rub
2 teaspoons garlic-flavored
oil Oil for coating grill grate
¾ cup Steakhouse Glaze
1 tablespoon ground chipotle chile.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Rub the ribs with the Cajun rub and coat with the garlic-flavored oil.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the ribs on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until you can pierce the meat of one of the thickest ribs easily with a fork, about 30 minutes, turning once after 10 minutes. Baste with the glaze and turn several times during the last 10 minutes of cooking.
4. Remove the ribs to a large platter and serve.

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Black pepper hides in the background. We add it “to taste” so regularly that most of us have forgotten what it tastes like. These short ribs are destined to change all that. They are purposefully black peppered and glazed with a reduction of aged balsamic vinegar that makes the perfume of the pepper bloom across your palate.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

SHORT RIBS
Short ribs are the last 3 inches of bone and meat on a primal beef rib that gets trimmed away when the primal cut is butchered down to a rib roast. They sell for a fraction of the cost of their high-priced brethren, even though they are essentially the same cut. Most people think short ribs need to be stewed or braised, but now that you know they are almost rib roast, you also know they are an excellent candidate for grilling. They don’t need to be brined, marinated, pounded, or pulled. Like a standing rib roast, short ribs are ready to cook just the way they are.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
12 pieces beef short ribs (about 3 pounds)
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper, or more to taste
Oil for coating grill grate
½ cup balsamic vinegar.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Heat the olive oil and garlic in a small skillet over medium heat until the garlic starts to sizzle; do not let it brown. Transfer to a bowl; reserve the skillet. Rub half of the flavored oil over the meaty parts of the short ribs. Reserve the remaining garlic oil for the balsamic glaze. Season the ribs with the salt and pepper.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the short ribs on the grill away from the heat, cover the grill, and cook until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest section of the meat registers about 145°F, about 30 minutes, turning once halfway through. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
4. While the short ribs are cooking, boil the balsamic vinegar in the same skillet you used to heat the olive oil, until the vinegar is reduced to about ¼ cup. Stir in the reserved garlic oil.
5. Remove the ribs to a serving platter; drizzle the balsamic glaze over the top and serve.

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Compared to other cuts of beef, the tenderloin is tiny (a chuck can weigh 100 pounds; a whole tenderloin maxes out at around 7 pounds), yet it accounts for a lion’s share of the potential value of the beef. This is because we will pay anything for tenderness, and a tenderloin is the tenderest of all cuts. At times it goes on sale, but beware. The sale price is usually for tenderloin that has not been trimmed, and the cut can lose 30 percent or more of its weight in unusable trimmings. This recipe makes the most of your investment, coating the beef in a fragrant, spicy rub and serving it with an orange-scented butter sauce. It is equally good served hot or at room temperature if you want to make it ahead.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

TIMING
Prep: 20 minutes
Grill: About 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 8 SERVINGS)
For the beef:
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground dried orange peel
½ teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1 beef tenderloin, about 3 pounds, trimmed and tied
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup chopped fresh herbs (flat-leaf parsley, rosemary, oregano, thyme, chervil, and/or tarragon)
Oil for coating grill grate
For the sauce:
4 tablespoons (½ stick) butter, salted or unsalted
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 cup fresh orange juice.

TIPS
– If you want to cook the tenderloin more than medium-rare, move the meat out of direct heat. Cook for 10 minutes more and check the internal temperature (130°F for medium, 140°F or higher for well-done).
– Dried orange peel is readily available in the spice aisles of most grocery stores.

DIRECTIONS
1. Mix the salt, orange peel, and pepper in a small bowl. Set aside ¼ teaspoon for the sauce. Rub the remaining seasoning all over the tenderloin. Coat the tenderloin with the olive oil, and press the herbs into the surface. Wrap in plastic wrap and set aside for at least 10 minutes.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the tenderloin on the grill, cover, and cook until browned on all 4 sides, about 5 minutes per side. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thicker end; it should register 120°F for mediumrare. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 400°F. Transfer the tenderloin to a cutting board and let rest for about 5 minutes.
4. To make the sauce, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter and the garlic in a small skillet until you smell the garlic aroma, about 1 minute. Add the rosemary and orange juice and boil until reduced by half. Cut the remaining 3 tablespoons butter into pieces and swirl them into the sauce; keep warm.
5. Slice the tenderloin into ½-inch-thick slices, pour the orange sauce over the top, and serve.

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Pesto-Rolled Beef Tenderloin With Roasted Pepper Rouille - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

Tenderloin may be the tenderest cut of beef, but it is also the blandest. It needs help from a rich sauce, a fragrant rub, or (as in this recipe) a stuffing of grilled vegetables and a crust of aromatic pesto. If you need to prepare it in advance, you can stuff it and wrap it (steps 1 through 7) and refrigerate it for several hours before grilling. It’s even great cold if you want to make the whole thing the day before.

TIMING
Prep: 40 minutes
Grill: About 35 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Grill screen
– Long-handled tongs.

TIP
– If you want to cook the tenderloin more than medium-rare, move the meat out of direct heat. Cook for 10 minutes more and check the internal temperature (130°F for medium, 140°F or higher for well-done).

THE GRILL
Gas:
Direct heat, medium-high (400° to 450°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Direct heat, light ash
Charcoal:
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 8 SERVINGS)
For the beef:
1 red bell pepper
1 chile, such as jalapeño or serrano
Oil for coating grill screen and grate
1 beef tenderloin, about 3 pounds, trimmed and tied
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 anchovy fillet, finely chopped
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
½ cup fresh breadcrumbs 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
For the pesto:
2 ounces fresh basil leaves (about 2 cups)
2 cloves garlic, chopped 1 tablespoon pine nuts
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Put an oiled grill screen on the grill and put the bell pepper and chile on the screen. Cook, covered, until they are charred on all sides, about 15 minutes for the bell pepper and 10 minutes for the chile. When charred, put in a covered bowl until cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, prepare the pesto by chopping the basil, garlic, and pine nuts in a food processor until finely chopped. Add the olive oil and process in pulses to a smooth paste. Season with the salt and pepper. Set aside.
4. To make a hole down the center of the tenderloin, into which you can insert the stuffing, position a sharpening steel at the thicker end of the tenderloin and push it through until its tip comes out the other side. Remove the steel. Insert a thin, long-bladed knife into the hole made by the steel several times, making shallow slits to enlarge the hole.
5. Peel the grilled peppers and discard the stem, core, and seeds. Dice finely and combine with the garlic, anchovy, parsley, breadcrumbs, olive oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl.
6. Stand the tenderloin on end and spoon the pepper mixture into the hole, packing it down with the steel or the handle of a wooden spoon. When about half of the stuffing is in the meat, turn the tenderloin over and fill the hole from the other side.
7. Put the beef on a sheet of plastic wrap and rub the exterior with the pesto. Wrap in the plastic and set aside for 10 minutes.
8. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the tenderloin on the grill, cover, and cook until browned on all 4 sides, about 5 minutes per side. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thicker end; it should register 120°F for medium-rare. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 400°F.
9. Let rest for about 5 minutes; slice into ½-inch-thick slices and serve.

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