Archive for the “Mastering The Big Kahuna And Other Incredible BBQ And Grilling Recipes” Category

Mastering The Big Kahuna And Other Incredible BBQ And Grilling Recipes.

The gustatory folly known as crown roast, made by grafting two or more racks in a ring, forcing the ribs to arch up and out like the spikes of a crown, is more impressive than it is difficult, and it is one of the few grand celebratory presentations that feed a crowd and spend less than an hour roasting. The speedy cooking time is due to its form. Because of the center hole, heat is able to reach all sides of the meat, so regardless of how many racks you use to form the crown, the roast never takes much longer to cook than a single rack would. The only thing that will slow it down is stuffing the center, which blocks the heat circulation. For that reason we recommend grilling the stuffing around the roast and filling the center just before you bring it to the table.

TIMING
Prep: 30 to 45 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Grill: About 45 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Grill screen or grill pizza pan
– Heavy-duty aluminum foil
– Heat-resistant bowl, about 6 inches in diameter, to support the center of the roast
– 2 sturdy long-handled spatulas.

TIP
– A frenched rack of lamb is one in which the meat, fat, and membrane from the ends of the rib bones have been stripped away, exposing about 2 inches of cleaned bare bone, which can be used as a handle when eating the lamb chops.

TYING A CROWN
Most butchers will be happy to assemble a crown roast for you, but if you want to do it yourself, you will need:
– Heavy-duty thread (or thin, sturdy kitchen twine)
– Large needle with a large eye, preferably curved (an upholstery needle works great)
– Heavy-duty cotton kitchen twine
– 2 to 3 racks of lamb, frenched.
1. On the nonmeaty side of the racks, make small slits into the meat (no more than½ inch long and¼ inch deep) between the ends of the bones. These slits will spread open when the rack is curved into a crown.
2. Butt the end of one rack up to another. Using the bones as anchors, sew the ends together, using as few stitches as possible. Repeat with as many racks as you are using.
3. Stand the sewn racks so that the cleaned ends of the bones are pointing upward. Bend the meat into a ring, with the meaty side facing inward. As the ring forms, the rib bones will arch outward. To close the ring, tie the ends together, using the bones as anchors. Stitch as needed to secure them in place. When complete, the tied roast resembles a crown (see illustration).

Crown Roast Of Lamb Embedded With Figs And Forest Herbs - BBQ And Grilling Recipes
THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill-middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill-1 side off Clean, oiled grate
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Charcoal: 20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 9 TO 13 SERVINGS – 2 TO 3 RIBS PER SERVING)
1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
½ cup fresh mint leaves
2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves
1 head (about 25 cloves) garlic, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon Provençal Herb Rub
¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil
5 Calimyrna figs, hard stem ends removed, coarsely chopped
3 racks of lamb, about 1½ pounds each, frenched and tied into a crown roast (see Tip, and “Tying a Crown,” right)
3½ to 4 pounds fingerling or new potatoes, washed and dried, halved if large
Oil for coating grill grate and screen.

DIRECTIONS
1. Put the parsley, mint, rosemary, and garlic in a food processor and chop finely (or you can chop them by hand). Add the herb rub and olive oil and process just until combined. Remove all but 2 tablespoons to a bowl. Add the figs and process until finely chopped. Put in another bowl.
2. Heat the grill as directed.
3. Using a thin-bladed knife, make a hole in the meaty part of the lamb right in front of each rib. Stick your pinky into the holes to widen them, and fill the holes with the fig mixture. Wrap small squares of foil around the exposed bones to keep them from scorching.
4. Toss the potatoes with 1/3 cup of the herb mixture and rub the remaining herb mixture all over the meaty parts of the lamb. Oil the grill screen and put the lamb in the center. Insert the heat-resistant bowl in the center of the crown to help it hold its shape.
5. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the roast (on the screen) on the grill away from the heat, cover, and cook for 15 minutes. Put the potatoes around the roast directly over the fire, cover, and cook for 15 minutes more. Remove the bowl from the center of the crown, and turn the potatoes. Cover and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into a thick part of the meat registers about 130°F and the potatoes are browned and tender, about 15 minutes more. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay between 350° and 375°F.
6. Using 2 spatulas, remove the roast to a large serving platter. Remove the string, and fill the center of the ring with the potatoes, if desired for presentation. Cut into chops, removing any string or thread from the lamb. Carve and serve.

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TIMING
Prep: 45 minutes (plus 40 minutes for roasting garlic)
Grill: About 1½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Heavy-duty aluminum foil
– Heavy-duty heat-resistant gloves.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill-middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill-1 side off Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
20 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on middle setting
Wood:
Indirect heat, medium ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Additional wood for replacement
Clean, oiled grate set 4 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 12 SERVINGS)
1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
1¼ cups boiling water
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large Spanish onion, finely chopped (about 2½ cups)
1½ pounds cremini mushrooms, halved or quartered, depending on size
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped roasted garlic (page 392)
1 tablespoon truffle oil
Kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
¾ cup Arborio or Carnaroli rice
1 cup mascarpone
1 cup heavy cream
4 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated (1 cup)
¼ teaspoon grated nutmeg
1 pumpkin (flat rather than round and at least 12 pounds), with a stem
8 ounces Italian fontina cheese, shredded (2 cups).

DIRECTIONS
1. Soak the dried porcini mushrooms in the boiling water in a medium bowl until softened, about 10 minutes. Drain, retaining the soaking liquid, and chop coarsely.
2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté until tender, about 3 minutes. Add the cremini mushrooms and rosemary, and sauté until the mushrooms lose their raw look. Remove from the heat and stir in the roasted garlic, truffle oil, reserved soaked mushrooms, salt, and pepper; set aside.
3. Combine the reserved mushroom soaking liquid with enough water to measure 3 cups. Bring to a boil in a large saucepan, and add a big pinch of kosher salt and the rice. Boil until the rice is tender, about 10 minutes. Drain, and mix the rice with the mascarpone, cream, Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, and nutmeg. Correct the seasoning with salt and pepper; set aside.
4. Heat the grill as directed.
5. Remove the stem end from the pumpkin and clean the interior cavity of seeds and pulp, just as you would if you were preparing to carve it as a jack-o’-lantern. Using a big spoon, scrape the flesh from the inside of the top half of the pumpkin, reducing its thickness by about half. Allow the scraped flesh to collect on the bottom, which will help the whole pumpkin roast more evenly. Cut a slice from the interior of the pumpkin’s lid, reducing its thickness by half, and place the slice in the pumpkin, on the bottom.
6. Set the pumpkin on a sheet of heavy-duty foil folded in fourths to make a square large enough to cradle the bottom of the pumpkin. Season the interior of the pumpkin with salt and pepper and scatter half of the fontina over the bottom. Fill the pumpkin with alternating layers of rice mixture and mushrooms, ending with mushrooms. Top with the remaining fontina. Put the lid on the pumpkin and wrap the whole thing, including the folded foil base, in 2 layers of heavy-duty foil.
7. Put the whole thing on the grill away from the heat, cover, and cook until the pumpkin is tender to the touch, about 1½ hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If using charcoal or wood, you may have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
8. Remove the pumpkin and set it on a large platter; let rest for 10 minutes. Remove the foil from the top and sides of the pumpkin, tearing it around the base so that the pumpkin is still resting on foil but excess foil doesn’t show. Remove the lid and serve portions of the rice and mushrooms along with pumpkin flesh scraped from the interior walls.

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The glow on this pig is built in layers, like an Old World painting. First it is under-painted with a ruby-colored spice rub, after which transparent layers of golden smoke gild its surface. Finally, it is lacquered with honey for a crackled, crystalline skin that’s as good as the melt-in-your-mouth meat beneath. Be strict about the size of the pig (see sidebar at right). Even a small suckling pig under 20 pounds will take up at least 2 feet of grill space, which means you will need a large, barrel-shaped grill or a gas grill with at least that much space between its outside burners to cook the pig correctly. If any part of the pig hangs directly over the fire, it will scorch; wrapping that part in heavy-duty foil will help, but it will not completely solve the problem. A big enough grill is key.

TIMING
Soak wood chunks: 1 hour
Prep: 30 minutes
Grill: 3 to 4 hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– 12 chunks apple or hickory wood (if not cooked on a wood fire)
– Heavy-duty aluminum foil
– Long-handled tongs
– Long-handled basting brush
– Large carving board.

PROCURING A PIG
A suckling pig is not just a small pig; it is an infant. The North American Meat Processors Association has developed guidelines for butchering and sizing animals, to which all butchers subscribe. Under these guidelines animals are categorized by size, A through D. Unless you have a gargantuan grill, you want to purchase a pig in the A weight range, which is 12 to 24 pounds. These will cost much more per pound than larger pigs, but you will end up paying about the same amount for the whole pig. Most supermarket meat departments will not be able to get an item this specific, so we suggest you look for a good-quality Italian or Hispanic butcher.

THE GRILL (MINIMUM 36-INCH-WIDE FIRE BED)
Gas:
Indirect heat, low (225°F)
3- or 4-burner grill-middle burner(s) off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, heavy ash
Split charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals per side)
Large, heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal 60 to 80 replacement coals
Clean, oiled grate on high setting
Wood:
Indirect heat, heavy ash
2 beds, 8 by 8 inches and 2 inches deep
Additional wood for replacement
Clean, oiled grate set 6 to 8 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 8 SERVINGS)
For the pig:
3 heads garlic, minced
1/3 cup honey
¼ cup kosher salt
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
¼ cup hot paprika
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 tablespoon crushed dried rosemary
½ cup canola oil
1 suckling pig, dressed, about 20 pounds (see “Procuring a Pig”, right)
Oil for coating grill grate
1 apple (optional)
For the glaze:
2 cups apple cider vinegar
2 cups honey
1 cup soy sauce
½ cup ketchup.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed. Soak the wood chunks in water for at least 1 hour.
2. Mix the garlic, honey, salt, black pepper, paprika, cloves, rosemary, and ½ cup oil in a bowl. Rub some of this mixture over the interior cavity of the pig.
3. Position the legs under the pig. The front legs will rest under the chin (the pig might come this way from the butcher), and the back legs should be set forward, bent from the hip, not the knee, so they extend along the belly. Tie the legs in place with several lengths of heavy-duty kitchen twine (see the illustration at right). Position the ears so that they cover the pig’s eyes, and tie twine over the ears to hold them in place. Cover the snout and tail with aluminum foil. Place a double thickness of foil around the front feet, and under the loin and the back feet in the center of the pig. Stuff a ball of foil (or a block of wood) in the pig’s mouth if you are planning to serve it with an apple in its mouth.
4. Put 3 chunks of soaked wood on each pile of charcoal, or on the grate right over the fire if using a gas grill. Brush the exposed grill grate and coat it with oil.
5. Put the pig right-side up on the grill, away from the heat. Coat with the remaining spice mixture, cover, and cook until the surface has begun to brown, about 2 hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay between 200° and 250°F. If using charcoal or wood, you may have to replenish the coals after the first hour.
6. While the pig is cooking, mix the ingredients for the glaze in a bowl; reserve half. Snip the twine on the pig and remove. Brush the pig with the remaining glaze, being sure to get it spread evenly in all the nooks and crannies. Stoke the fire, add the remaining wood chunks, cover the grill, and cook the pig until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of one of the thighs registers 165°F, making sure that the thermometer is not touching bone, about another hour. The temperature gauge should stay between 200° and 250°F.
7. Remove the pig to a large carving board; let rest for 10 minutes. Replace the foil ball or block of wood in its mouth with an apple, if desired. Carve by cutting the pig into leg and shoulder sections and carving the meat from the bone. Cut the ribs into 2-rib sections. Serve with the reserved glaze for dipping.

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Seaside clambakes are a New England tradition. Native Americans are said to have taught the Pilgrims the technique, which is an all-day undertaking. For an authentic clambake on the beach, you dig a big pit in the sand about 2 to 3 feet deep and line the pit with rocks. Then you burn plenty of wood over the rocks for 2 to 3 hours, until the rocks are smoking hot (about 400°F). After you’ve raked away the coals, layers of seaweed, potatoes, corn, small clams, mussels, and sometimes sausages or other ingredients go directly over the hot rocks. Add some more seaweed, top with a huge, sea-soaked burlap tarp and more hot rocks, and let the whole shebang steam until the food is cooked through and infused with the briny aroma of the sea. If you don’t have a beach nearby (or enough wood to burn for 3 hours), here’s the backyard method. We use a covered kettle grill as the pit and rehydrated store-bought seaweed in place of fresh seaweed. The ingredients are layered in a large roasting pan, and the pan is put directly on the coals on the bottom of the grill. You could also do this on a gas grill with medium heat under the roasting pan, but we like the charcoal kettle grill because it’s closer to the original method.

TIMING
Soak wood chips: 1 hour
Prep: 30 minutes
Grill: 1 to 1½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Large roasting pan, such as a turkey roaster (heavy-duty if disposable)
– Heat-resistant grill mitts (preferably heatproof silicone)
– Long-handled tongs
– 40-by-15-inch piece of burlap
– 2 cups wood chunks or chips, preferably oak.

TIPS
– Look for dried kombu seaweed in an Asian grocery store or large supermarket.
– Soaking mussels in salt water helps to rid them of any lingering sand. Mix ½ cup of salt in about a gallon of water in a large bowl. Add the mussels and let soak for 1 hour. Then scrub the mussels with a stiff brush under running water and yank off the mosslike “beard”, using pliers if necessary.
– For the burlap, an old coffee sack works well. Ask for one at your local coffee shop. Some hardware stores also carry burlap.

THE GRILL
Gas: Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) on medium-low
Charcoal:
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side), single layer of coals in center
20 replacement coals.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 10 TO 12 SERVINGS)
3 ounces dried kombu (kelp) seaweed (see Tips)
3 pounds small red-skinned or white potatoes, scrubbed
1 tablespoon crab boil seasoning, such as Old Bay, or sea salt
2 onions, peeled, leaving the root end intact, and cut lengthwise into eighths
12 ounces cured Portuguese linguiça or Spanish chorizo, sliced ½ inch thick
8 ears fresh corn, shucked and halved crosswise
3 dozen littleneck or small cherrystone clams
3 dozen mussels, scrubbed and debearded (see Tips)
1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley
6 live lobsters, 1 to 1½ pounds each
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, melted
2 lemons, cut into wedges.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed. Soak the wood chunks or chips in water for 1 hour.
2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Remove from the heat and add the kombu, letting it soak until softened, about 5 minutes. Reserve the soaking liquid.
3. Put a thick layer of seaweed over the bottom of a large roasting pan such as a turkey roaster (heavy-duty if disposable), reserving some of the seaweed for the top layer. Put the potatoes in a single layer over the seaweed. Sprinkle the potatoes with a little of the crab boil seasoning, then add layers of onions, corn, sausage, clams, and mussels, in that order, sprinkling some crab boil seasoning and a few parsley sprigs over each layer. Pour about 1 cup of the seaweed soaking liquid over all of the ingredients. Arrange the remaining seaweed over the top. Soak the burlap in the remaining soaking liquid until saturated, 5 minutes. Fold the burlap to make a double thickness, then drape it over the seaweed, tucking the edges inside the roasting pan to cover the ingredients.
4. Rake a single layer of hot coals over the center of the grill, leaving the remaining hot coals banked on opposite sides. Put half of the soaked wood chunks or chips over the coals on the sides. When the wood begins to smolder, put the roasting pan over the coals in the middle of the grill, cover the grill, and cook with the vents open until the potatoes are tender and the clams and mussels have opened, 1 to 1½ hours. Test the potatoes by lifting up a corner of the cover, digging down with tongs, and poking the potatoes with a knife or fork. Add the replacement coals and the remaining wood chunks to both sides of the grill when the old ones begin to die out. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F.
5. About 30 minutes before serving, bring 2 large pots of salted water to a boil. Add half the lobsters to each pot. Cover and cook until the shells are bright red, 8 to 12 minutes per batch. Remove and cover loosely with foil to keep warm.
6. Remove the roasting pan from the grill and transfer to a large trivet for serving. Or transfer the ingredients to a large serving platter. Discard the seaweed, parsley, and any clams or mussels that have not opened. Pour any juices from the bottom of the pan over the clambake. Sprinkle with a bit more crab boil seasoning. Cut the cooked lobsters in half lengthwise and arrange on top. Serve with the melted butter for drizzling or dipping, and lemon wedges for squeezing.

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Nothing surpasses the sight (and the smell) of prime rib encrusted with garlic and herbs emerging from the grill. Although this recipe is spectacular with any grade of beef, use it as an excuse to treat yourself to real prime rib. Only 2 percent of the beef in the United States is graded prime, and most of that never reaches the retail market, so you will have to seek it out. A trusted butcher can order it for you even if it is something he doesn’t normally carry. Ask your butcher to cut the meat from the bone along the ribs, but leave it attached at its widest end.

TIMING
Prep: 15 minutes
Grill: About 2½ hours.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Large rimmed sheet pan
– 2 sturdy spatulas for lifting the roast.

THE GRILL
Gas:
Indirect heat, medium (325° to 350°F)
3- or 4-burner grill – middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
Charcoal: 30 replacement coals
Heavy-duty drip pan set between banks of charcoal
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 14 SERVINGS)
For the beef:
7-bone prime rib roast of beef, about 7 pounds
½ cup chopped fresh herbs (rosemary, flat-leaf parsley, oregano, thyme, and/or basil)
8 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
For the pudding:
6 eggs, large or extra-large
2¼ cups milk
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 cups flour
1/3 cup drippings from the beef
2 tablespoons freshly grated horseradish or jarred horseradish, drained

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. If the meat was not cut from the bone when you purchased it (see the recipe introduction), do this yourself, leaving it attached at its widest end.
3. Mix the herbs, garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper in a small bowl and rub all over the meat, including the underside where it is sitting on the bones.
4. Put the roast, bone-side down, on a large rimmed sheet pan and put it on the grill away from the heat. Cover the grill and cook for about 1 hour. Check the drippings in the pan; there should be about ½ cup. Remove the pan and keep the drippings in it. Return the beef to the grill away from the heat. Cover the grill and continue cooking until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers about 130°F for medium-rare, about 1½ more hours. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should stay at around 350°F. If using charcoal, you may have to replenish coals after each hour.
5. Just before the beef is finished cooking, combine all of the ingredients for the Yorkshire pudding in a bowl and stir just until combined.
6. Remove the beef to a large carving board and keep warm. Return the sheet pan to the grill; cover and heat for a minute or two. Add the pudding batter, spreading it to cover the pan; cover and cook until puffed and browned at the edges, 10 to 15 minutes.
7. Slice the roast and cut the pudding into 14 pieces; serve.

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Lotus is an olfactory orgasm; a deep whiff can lead to momentary swooning. The magic of cooking in lotus is that its intoxicating fragrance infuses anything it touches. Lotus leaves come dried and are available in Asian groceries. They are huge, spanning 2 feet or more. All you have to do is soak them in a sink (or large bowl) filled with warm water until they become pliable, about 10 minutes. The fish in this recipe is left whole, but its main skeletal bones are removed, making it easy to serve.

TIMING
Prep: 40 minutes (plus 5 minutes for Szechwan salt)
Grill: About 20 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Grill screen
– Long-handled spatula

REMOVING THE BONES FROM A WHOLE FISH
You will need:
– Clean cutting board
– Sharp, narrow-bladed knife (boning knife)
– Heavy-duty scissors
1. Lay the fish on its side on the cutting board, with its back facing the hand holding the knife. Make a slit through the skin just above and running along the central back ridge of the fish (see photo 2).
2. Using short strokes, work your knife along the bones supporting the dorsal fin (see the illustration), lifting the flesh from the bone down the length of the backbone, all the way from the head to the tail. As you are cutting, you should feel bone against one side of the knife at all times. This will ensure that you aren’t leaving edible flesh on the carcass.
3. Continue cutting until the entire backbone is exposed and you have cut over the ribs where the ribs end in the belly. One side of the rib cage should now be separate from the flesh of the fish (see photo 3).
4. To separate the flesh from the tail end of the fish, lay the flat side of the knife against the backbone, with the blade facing the tail. Hold the head end of the fish steady and cut back toward the tail, cutting through the skin connecting to the anal fin (see the illustration), but stopping before you get all the way to the tail. One side of the fish will now be separate from the skeleton but will still be attached at the head and tail.
5. Turn the fish over and fillet the other side in the same way.
6. Using scissors, cut the backbone where it connects to the head and again where it connects to the tail. Remove the skeleton. Use the tip of your knife to remove any small bones still remaining along the belly.

THE GRILL
Gas: Indirect heat, medium-high (350° to 375°F)
3- or 4-burner grill-middle burner(s) off
2-burner grill – 1 side off
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal: Indirect heat, medium ash
Split charcoal bed (about 2 dozen coals per side)
Clean, oiled grate on medium to low setting
Wood: Indirect heat, medium ash 12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep Clean, oiled grate set 4 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
For the stuffing:
2 cups brewed jasmine tea made from 2 teabags or 2 tablespoons loose tea
1½ cups sushi rice
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger
1 large dried fig, chopped
2 tablespoons shredded unsweetened coconut
½ teaspoon Sesame Szechwan Salt
2 scallions, roots and wilted leaves trimmed, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons sliced or slivered almonds
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
For the fish:
2 whole red snappers or sea bass, about 2 pounds each, scales, gills, and fins removed
4 dried lotus leaves
2 tablespoons soy sauce
Juice of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
Oil for coating grill grate and grill screen.

DIRECTIONS
1. To make the stuffing, combine the brewed tea, rice, and soy sauce in a large saucepan; cover and heat to boiling over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes.
2. Add the crystallized ginger, fig, coconut, Szechwan salt, scallions, almonds, and cilantro to the pan (do not mix); cover and set aside for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork, mixing the ingredients evenly into the rice.
3. While the rice is cooking, remove the central skeleton from the fish. Submerge the lotus leaves in a large bowl of hot water. Soak until pliable, about 10 minutes.
4. Heat the grill as described.
5. Brush the fish inside and out with the soy sauce, lemon juice, and sesame oil. Place 2 lotus leaves on top of one another (dark-side down), and spread them out flat. Place a fish at one edge, and fill with half the stuffing. Fold the edges of the leaves over the ends of the fish and roll the fish up in the leaves until the package is completely encased; secure the loose end with a wooden toothpick. Repeat with the other fish and the remaining lotus leaves and stuffing. Oil the grill screen and put the lotus-wrapped fish on the screen, toothpick-side down.
6. Brush and oil the grill grate. Put the grill screen on the grill, positioning the fish away from the fire. Cover the grill and cook for 8 to 10 minutes per side; let rest for 5 minutes.
7. Slit open the lotus wrappers and serve.

Fish Stuffed With Five-Treasure Jasmine Rice Roasted In A Lotus Leaf - BBQ And Grilling Recipes

1. Soaking lotus in sink
2. Beginning boning fish
3. Finishing boning fish
4. Wrapping stuffed fish
5. Fish on grill
6. Unwrapped and cut fish

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Under the assumption that nothing exceeds like excess, we offer this, our rendition of ubercarne. If you can find fresh morels, the aroma will be heightened, but dried morels are wonderful as well and are a compromise only when compared to fresh. Plus they have the advantage of producing a concentrated soaking liquid that adds flavor to the stuffing when reduced. To get a jump on the meal, assemble the tenderloin ahead, refrigerate it for a day or more, and then grill it just before serving.

TIMING
Prep: 25 minutes (plus 5 minutes for rub)
Rest before grilling: 10 minutes
Grill: About 25 minutes.

BBQ TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
– Long-handled tongs
– Heavy-duty cotton kitchen twine.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-high (450°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting
Wood:
Direct heat, light ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 8 SERVINGS)
6 ounces fresh morels, or 1 ounce dried morels, soaked in hot water and drained
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 plum tomato, finely chopped
1 cup beef broth or mushroom soaking liquid, if using dried morels
Kosher salt and ground black pepper to taste
4 ounces pâté de foie gras or goose liver pâté, broken or cut into pieces
1 trimmed beef tenderloin, about 5 pounds,
2 tablespoons Tuscan Rosemary Rub
Oil for coating grill grate.

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat the grill as directed.
2. Chop the morels coarsely. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the shallots, garlic, and rosemary and sauté until tender, about 2 minutes. Add the tomato and mushrooms and sauté until the vegetables soften, about 3 minutes. Add the broth or soaking liquid and simmer until the liquid is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Cool until barely warm, and stir in the pâté.
3. Make a lengthwise slit about halfway through the tail end of the tenderloin about 4 inches from the end, right where the meat tapers. Tie the wide end (butt end) with kitchen twine to make a neat, cylindrical shape. Fold in the tail end and tie it in place so that the tenderloin is uniformly shaped from end to end, to help it cook evenly.
4. To make a hole down the center of the tenderloin that you can stuff, position a sharpening steel at the thicker end of the tenderloin and push it through until its tip comes out the other side. Remove the steel. Insert a long, thin-bladed knife into the hole made by the steel several times, making short slits to enlarge the hole.
5. Stand the tenderloin on end and spoon the morel mixture into the hole, packing it down with the steel or the handle of a wooden spoon. When you’ve used about half of the stuffing, turn the tenderloin over and fill it from the other side.
6. Put the beef on a sheet of plastic wrap and rub the exterior with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Sprinkle with the rosemary rub and roll it around until coated. Wrap in the plastic and set aside for 10 minutes.
7. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil. Put the tenderloin on the grill, cover, and cook until browned on 4 sides, 6 to 7 minutes per side. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thicker end; it should register 125°F for medium-rare. If your grill has an external temperature gauge, it should stay at around 400°F.
8. Transfer the beef to a carving board; let rest for 5 minutes. Slice into ½-inch-thick slices and serve.

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Mixed grill was probably the first cooked meal ever served. It’s easy to imagine: a variety of meats from the day’s hunt, cooked over the communal fire and eaten, not in courses, but all at once, juices and flavors mingling and enhancing one another. Our selection is largely poultry, mingling game hen, duck breast, and sausage with fresh figs, orange, and fennel.

THE GRILL
Gas: Direct heat, medium-low (300°F)
Clean, oiled grate
Charcoal: Direct heat, medium ash
12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals)
Clean, oiled grate on medium setting
Wood:
Direct heat, medium ash
12-by-12-inch bed, 3 inches deep
Clean, oiled grate set 4 inches above the fire.

INGREDIENTS (MAKES 6 SERVINGS)
3 game hens, about 1 ½ pounds each, split lengthwise
3 boneless (but not skinless) Muscovy duck breast halves, about 8 ounces each, skin scored with 3 or 4 slashes
4 cups Orange-Fennel Brine
1 ounce pancetta or bacon, finely chopped
1 cup white wine
1 cup orange juice
12 fresh figs, halved lengthwise
12 small fennel twigs (optional)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 sausage links (your choice – anything from mild Italian to lamb with garlic)
Oil for coating grill grate
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces.

DIRECTIONS
1. Put the game hen halves and duck breasts in a gallon-size zipper-lock bag with the brine. Seal the zipper, leaving about an inch open; push on the bag to release any trapped air through the opening, and close the zipper completely. Massage the liquid gently into the meat and refrigerate for about 1 hour.
2. Meanwhile, heat the pancetta in a small saucepan until the fat renders. Add the wine and orange juice and boil until reduced to 1 cup; set aside.
3. Heat the grill as directed.
4. Spear each fig half with a fennel twig (if desired) and coat the figs with the olive oil. Poke the sausages several times with a fork.
5. Remove the game hen halves and duck breasts from the brine; discard the brine. Pat dry. Brush the grill grate and coat it with oil; put the hens, skin-side down, on the grill. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Turn, and put the duck breasts, skin-side down, and the sausages on the grill. Cover and grill until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a game hen breast, a duck breast, or the end of a sausage registers 165°F, about 12 minutes, turning the sausages and duck breasts halfway through.
6. Remove everything to a large serving platter and keep warm. If using gas, turn the grill to high, put a grill screen on the grill, and heat for 1 minute. (If using charcoal or wood, place the grill screen over the hottest part of the fire.) Put the figs, cut-side down, on the grill screen, cover the grill, and cook until the figs have browned, about 3 minutes. Transfer to the platter.
7. Reheat the reduced wine and orange juice to boiling. Mix in the butter, stir until melted, and pour the sauce over everything. Serve immediately.

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